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Evaluating the R-Index and the P-Curve

Psychology, Science · · 3 comments

Several years ago, Uri Simonsohn (along with Leif Nelson and Joe Simmons) introduced the psychology community to the idea of p-hacking, and his related concept for detecting p-hacking, the p-curve. He later demonstrated that this p-curve could be used as an estimate of true effect size in a way that was better at correcting for bias than the common trim-and-fill method.

Now, more recently, Ulrich Schimmack has been making a few waves himself, using his own metric called the R-index, which he has stated is useful as a test of how likely a result is to be replicable. He has also gained some attention for using it as what he refers to as a “doping test”, to identify areas of research—and researchers themselves—that are likely to have used questionable research practices (QRPs) that may have inflated the results. In his paper, he shows that his R-index indicates an increase in QRPs from research in 1960 to research in 2011. He also shows that this metric is able to predict the replicability of studies, by analyzing data from the Reproducibility Project and the Many Labs Project.Continue Reading

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The Story of the Lost Passport

Personal · · Leave a comment

Folks, when you’re travelling, make sure you know where your passport is at all times. Why do I say that? Because forgetting your passport at an inopportune time can lead to the biggest headache that you’ll ever face. I now know this from personal experience. Gather ’round, kids, and let me tell you the story of when I made a stupid mistake and then suffered for it for the rest of the day.

The story begins in Chicago. Yesterday. My friends and I had arrived at O’Hare airport on our way back from a social psychology convention in Austin. We had a layover in Chicago and were waiting for our second flight to the Kitchener airport. It was an evening flight, and I was looking forward to being home. The employees at the desk announced that our flight was ready to board, and I grabbed my things, ready to finally leave! And then they announced, “Because this is an international flight, please have your passport ready to show the attendant along with your boarding pass.” And that’s when my heart sank.Continue Reading

I work to live not live to work

The Basics of a Basic Income

Politics, Society · · 1 comment

About a month ago, Switzerland made international news by holding a referendum on whether or not to give all Swiss citizens a basic income of about $2800 a month. Although the date for the vote still hasn’t been set (as far as I can tell), it certainly raised quite a buzz as analysts tried to frame the pros and cons of a proposal that, quite frankly, is not a new idea at all. Here’s a good summary of some of the arguments and research on the issue.

At its heart, a “basic income” proposal is a system in which each resident of a particular country or region receives a sum of money unconditionally by the government. Unlike many systems of welfare, such money comes with no strings attached, and no means testing to ensure that one needs such assistance. This means that it cuts out much of the bureaucracy involved with welfare benefits: no more case workers ensuring that people are indeed looking for work; no more food stamps that force individuals to spend money on food rather than on other items that may be equally necessary. The system, at least in one sense, is inherently fair, in that everyone in the country receives the same amount: rich or poor, every person gets the basic income from the government.Continue Reading

Soy to the world

Holidays for the Vegetarian

Personal, Society · · 1 comment

I’ve been a vegetarian for about a year and a half now, and reduced my meat intake for a couple years before that. This wasn’t a complicated or difficult process, despite what some people seem to think. The most difficult part of being a vegetarian (at least for me) is dealing with situations that arise when one is with friends and family who aren’t also veg*n. Since I’m fresh off the holidays and have spent the past six days with family, none of whom are veg*n, I wanted to share just a few situations that can be tricky to deal with. But first, a few definitions, just so we’re clear:

Vegetarian: A person who does not eat meat. Vegan: A person who does not eat or otherwise use any animal products (e.g., dairy milk, eggs, honey, leather, cosmetic products tested on animals). Veg*n: A catch-all term used to refer to people who are either vegetarian or vegan, or something similar. The Questions

As I said, none of my family is veg*n. I am alright with this; I view moral issues (especially ones concerning diet) as personal choices that must be made by an individual. I am not here to judge, just to follow my own personal standard of ethics. But that can make for some situations that get tricky or somewhat frustrating. For instance, almost invariably, the first question a veg*n gets asked when they mention that they are veg*n is some variant of this: “What do…Continue Reading